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I am done with my graceless heart

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man-of-prose:

"If I were to think of and dwell on disastrous possibilities, I could do nothing. I throw myself headlong into my work, and come up again with my studies; if the storm within gets too loud, I take a glass too much to stun myself.
Cracked, of course; when you look at what one ought to be. But in the old days I used to feel less of a painter, now painting is becoming a distraction for me, like rabbit hunting for the cracked-brained: they do it to distract themselves.
My concentration becomes more intense, my hand more sure. That is why I almost dare to swear to you that my painting will improve. Because I have nothing left but that.”
-Vincent van Gogh, Letter to Theo July 1888

man-of-prose:

"If I were to think of and dwell on disastrous possibilities, I could do nothing. I throw myself headlong into my work, and come up again with my studies; if the storm within gets too loud, I take a glass too much to stun myself.

Cracked, of course; when you look at what one ought to be. But in the old days I used to feel less of a painter, now painting is becoming a distraction for me, like rabbit hunting for the cracked-brained: they do it to distract themselves.

My concentration becomes more intense, my hand more sure. That is why I almost dare to swear to you that my painting will improve. Because I have nothing left but that.”

-Vincent van Gogh, Letter to Theo July 1888


(via man-of-prose)
classicpenguin:

Happy Labor Day everyone! Enjoy the last weekend at the beach and your last chance to wear white, but don’t forget to take a minute to think about what today means. Plenty of great reading options: Steinbeck, Zola, Sinclair’s The Jungle, and James’s The Princess Casamassina. For something a little different, check out Ernest Poole’s The Harbor. Poole, the first winner of the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, writes about the plight of Billy, an aspiring writer torn between sympathy for the working class with an appreciation of middle class social mobility. It’s an incendiary documentation of labor relations by an all-too-underappreciated figure in 20th-century American fiction.

classicpenguin:

Happy Labor Day everyone! Enjoy the last weekend at the beach and your last chance to wear white, but don’t forget to take a minute to think about what today means. Plenty of great reading options: Steinbeck, Zola, Sinclair’s The Jungle, and James’s The Princess Casamassina. For something a little different, check out Ernest Poole’s The HarborPoole, the first winner of the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, writes about the plight of Billy, an aspiring writer torn between sympathy for the working class with an appreciation of middle class social mobility. It’s an incendiary documentation of labor relations by an all-too-underappreciated figure in 20th-century American fiction.


(via classicpenguin)

tennants-hair:

when i find myself in times of trouble

the 12th doctor comes to me

speaking words of wisdom

image


(via doctorwho)

(via ellaphoa)

(Source: henckels)

"This wine is too good for toast-drinking, my dear. You don’t want to mix emotions up with a wine like that. You lose the taste."

~ Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises  (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

(Source: whyallcaps.us)


(via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

"You were born with wings, why prefer to crawl through life?"

~ Rumi (via tanesworld)

(Source: wordsaretimeless)


(via love-and-stars-shine-bright)

"Bad books on writing tell you to ‘WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW’, a solemn and totally false adage that is the reason there exist so many mediocre novels about English professors contemplating adultery."

~

Joe Haldeman (via maxkirin)

Just choked on my fucking drink

(via thingsididntknowwereerotic)


(via elizabitchtaylor)

(via thejessicats)